The Fall And Rise Of Lard

Lard once was a must-have for cooking. Now, lard is seen as bad for being fatty and it “causing clogged arteries”. Over the past one hundred years it hasn’t been used as much do to easy alternatives like Crisco and cooking oil.

Lard was such an important product back before there was Crisco and refrigeration. It was used for cooking, baking, soaps, candles, burning, lubrication, etc. The hate against Lard  started in the early 1900s when a company named Proctor & Gamble created Crisco in 1910, the hydrogenated vegetable oil that looks like lard. They led the one of the most massive food advertising campaigns ever. They gave it away for free, free cook books and created ads that claimed it was more digestible and healthier than lard. Eventually they switched the whole USA into using Crisco as their main cooking fat over lard. 

It is crazy how they were able to turn a country that has been using lard in almost everything since it was founded- to Crisco, with just a massive ad campaign.

Little did people know vegetable shortening is full of trans-fats that clog arteries and cause heart attacks,  while Lard is full of Vitamin D and has no trans-fat. Lard is also healthier than butter as it has less cholesterol and saturated fat than butter

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Today, in the slow food movement people are starting to appreciate lard again for all its traits. Artisans are starting to use it in candles and soaps, hipsters love all the old/new food and small farms on the rise raising pastured heritage breed pork. Lard is great for cooking, baking, pie crusts, frying and more. I can’t wait to bake with Lard for the first time.

Today my Mom and I rendered lard out of fatback that we got from the two KuneKune boars we had processed. I will write a blog post on how we did it tomorrow.

 

 

 

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